Experimentation, Music

Experimentation : 030517

After feeling increasingly frustrated with Ableton Live over the past few years, I've recently been playing with PreSonus' Studio One 3 (which you can download a stripped down free version of). After being impressed and discovering tons of things I *wished* I could do in Ableton were actually possible in Studio One, I decided to take the plunge and make the switch. I'm still getting used to the difference in workflow, but I'm starting to get the hang of it and become productive.

Here are a few things that caused me to switch:

  • Ability to edit multiple piano rolls for different tracks in a single window (AMAZING)
  • Much easier and precise tempo change editing
  • Ability to precisely type in specific values on automation curve nodes
  • Easier re-arrangement of the song flow with the Arranger window
  • The scratch pad window for non-destructively trying out different ideas
  • Visual/thumbnail reference to plugins and instruments
  • Pinning of Instruments/Plugins so multiple instruments on different tracks open at once

And here are a few things I wish it had (or maybe haven't learned how to do yet)

  • Actual looping of clips (rather than duplicating clips)
  • Ability to create track presets (rather than just instrument/fx chain presets)
  • Ability to adjust tempo while track is playing without the audio stopping

Overall, I'm definitely impressed with Studio One. After learning the basics, I even created the beginnings of a new track. This track features PunchBox (Kick), Serum (Bass 1) fed through Studio One's built in Arpeggiator, Predator (Bass 2), BFD2 (Drums) and the Matrix-12 (Lead).

Here's the fruits of the weekend!

LISTEN: